Every feature in fair accord: A review of the Edison Hudson

The eagle-eyed and sagacious among you will already have placed the quote in the title as being from the 14th century middle english alliterative poem, ‘Sir Gawain and the Green Knight’. It comes from the description of the green knight himself as follows:

‘Half a giant on earth I hold him to be, But believe him no less than the largest of men, And the seemliest in his stature to see, as he rides, For in back and in breast though his body was grim, His waist in its width was worthily small, And formed with every feature in fair accord was he. Great wonder grew in hall At his hue most strange to see, For man and gear and all Were green as green could be.’

In a way this could sets up beautifully the review of my Edison Hudson in emerald-green. For it too is, ‘half a giant’ in terms of its size. with ‘every feature in fair accord‘ and certainly ‘his hue most strange to see. for man and gear and all, were green as green could be.’

IMGP1201Description: As mentioned above the Edison Hudson is a large pen (see dimensions below). It is smooth and elegant with a pleasing taper down the length of the barrel to the base. The cap is large but surprisingly light with a flat top and an understated but strong tapered rhodium plated clip which functions perfectly. The cap secures to the body of the pen within a full turn.

IMGP1211The main body of the pen itself comprises of a good-sized, concave grip section which again screws firmly onto the barrel. One of the things that I like about this pen is the fit. Everything comes together so well. The screw threads are deep and exact and have been expertly machined. This all gives a sense of confidence when using the pen, particularly as you can make this pen into an eyedropper should you so desire. The barrel itself starts out quite broad near the section and has a distinct taper toward the base. The barrel is neatly engraved with the make and model which is something I particularly like on a  fountain pen.

IMGP1209Another worthy aspect of this pen is the way it has been finished. Along with the fit, the finish of this pen is startlingly good. There is a ‘behind the scenes’ video of the Edison pen company’s process which you can watch here. Suffice it to say that it is excellently manufactured and lovingly finished.

The green model has a seemingly limitless depth of pearlescent colour to it that shows a myriad of greens from a light spring pea green through what I would call a deep forest green right through to an olive black. It is wonderful. Though to be pedantic it is not a colour I would personally call ’emerald’, but as I said I’m being extra picky here.

IMGP1216Dimensions: The Edison Hudson is 152mm (5.98″) long when capped and 130mm  (5.12″) uncapped. Posted it is 168mm  (6.6″) long. The diameter of the barrel is 14.3mm  (0.563″) at its widest point. The pen with a fully inked converter weighs in at 23g.

IMGP1218On test: I purchased this pen with the F nib, which is my preference and these days generally pair it with Diamine Salamander ink (one of my favourites) I think that they form a formidable combination. In use the pen is very comfortable indeed.  I find the pen is the perfect width for me at present. It is one of the few pens I can use for a prolonged period without discomfort which is good as I bought it as an everyday user and it has not to this day disappointed in any way. I tend to prefer to use it unposted as it is slightly back-heavy when posted and of course quite long.

IMGP1205_2A word about the nib. I like this steel nib a lot. For a fine nib it is very smooth, giving just the right amount of feedback for me. It writes with a well-defined wettish line. There is very little line variation as you would expect with a fine steel nib but it is still a great pleasure to use.

IMGP1210Summary: This pen is smooth and engrossingly tactile in use. However with a steel nib this pen is currently retailing in the UK at £115 and in the USA at about $149 so this is no impulse buy. To purchase it with a gold nib it is considerably more expensive (and certainly out of my normal price range). The Hudson is however a great choice for the fountain pen enthusiast. The quality of the pen is outstanding. It is part of Edison’s normal ‘production line’ but it is no less expertly put together for that. It gives a real sense of confidence in use with the finish being nothing short of stunning. Great pen…

AFWAP

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3 thoughts on “Every feature in fair accord: A review of the Edison Hudson

  1. I expected a beautiful emerald green, sadly disappointed. The pen I hope is more appealing in person, but not to insult your decision, it is strictly a matter of taste. I agree at that price for me it definitely would not be an impulse buy. I think Stipula make a true emerald green pen in one of their lines. It must be my dumb but I thought you were giving a link to a video of the manufacturing process. If so I did not see it. I really enjoy seeing that type of video that shows the manufacturing process. So if there is a video could you share the link,please. Thanks for your blog it is one of my favorites, Shirl

    1. Hi Shirl
      Yes I think as I said in the post that the term is something of a misnomer, but that’s what Edison call it. Thanks for spotting the missed link, I’ve corrected it now and it should work. Appreciate the help God bless, 🙂

  2. I’ve been after an Edison pen for a while now. They look so nice, and that they can make them in a wide swathe of different coloured materials is just so cool. While I’d love a custom Menlo I’ve got my eye on the new “Blue Steel” Collier which is cheaper, and more readily available.

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